Four Elements for Secure Remote Management

After identifying all the potential access points to be managed, the next step is to consider specific elements that are important in planning a secure remote management solution that meets your needs.

Scalability

The ideal remote management solution is one that is designed to grow with an organisation. As the data centre grows, so to should the management system. However, it is also important to be aware of the overall costs of client licenses, etc. when remote users are added.

Flexibility

Because your data centre will continue to evolve and grow, the remote management solution must be designed to protect your investment from the start. While reconfiguration may come with the territory, choosing remote management products designed with maximum flexibility will pay off in the long run. To maximize IT resources, avoid proprietary systems that tie you to one vendor or add hidden deployment and maintenance costs to your data centre.

Multi-platform Support and Client OS Independence

If your data centre uses only one type of computer and operating system (for example, a PC running Microsoft Windows XP Server), it is possible your network may eventually include multiple platforms, servers, devices, and operating systems. Therefore, your remote management solution should provide multiplatform control and be OS independent. They should also provide a local-management interface to the remote user, as opposed to requiring another management interface layer for the IT staff to learn.

Security

Because of the sprawling nature of today’s data centres, patches and updates to operating systems and security of managed systems have become a considerable burden, especially with the frequency of these changes. Moreover, these patches and updates typically require secure connections and interactions with remote systems.

Some solution providers claim that their remote management solutions are “secure” when they actually, support only a few security related features. Some console servers, for example, are called “secure” just because they support SecureShell (SSH) connections.