Legal Papers Served On Facebook Sets Interesting Precedent

Australian lawyers have used the social networking platform Facebook to serve legal papers to a couple, after repeatedly failing to contact them in person.

In a decision of its own kind, the Australian courts allowed the online delivery of legal papers via Facebook platform to the couple, who defaulted on a loan, after ascertaining that the profiles found by lawyers did belong to the defendant couple.

Lawyers from Canberra-based law firm Meyer Vandenburg convinced the judge of Australian Supreme Court in Canberra, to use Facebook as a way to serve legal documents to defendants, after failing to reach them personally.

Mark McCormack, one of the lawyers said, “We couldn't find the defendants personally after many attempts so we thought we would try and find them on Facebook”.

The lawyer further avowed that the Facebook pages of the defendants appeared, after his team carried out an intense public search based on the email addresses of the couple in question.

The couple, Gordon Poyser and Carmel Rita Corbo, have been allegedly failed to continue repayments on a £44,000 loan they had obtained from MKM Capital, a mortgage provider firm.

In addition, the couple didn’t respond to emails from the law firm, and ignored the court appearance on 3rd October, Mr McCormack added.

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Our Comments

Lawyers (and debt collectors) can be creative when it comes to getting back their monnies. Using Facebook will set a dangerous precedent, especially given the fact that it borders on harassment and it is likely that the couple could even sue the prosecuting party violating their privacy.

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