Controversial GPS Watch Lets Parents Track Their Children

Parents can now buy a virtual chaperon for their children to keep track of their movements in real time in what some say is a step too far in the widespread movement of tracking and logging.

The £149 Num8 watch has been designed by British firm Lok8u and was launched at the Consumer Electronics Show, in Las Vegas and although it looks like a bog-standard wristwatch, it actually hides a GPS chip that tracks the movements of the wristwatch bearer.

Parents will be able to "ping" the wristwatch to get a real time and get up to date movements and coordinates. and will alert them if it leaves a pre-designated area. They can also log on Num8's website to track their child's present location.

According to the manufacturer, the GPS unit has an accuracy of 3 metres and if removed, will send an emergency text to a default mobile number complete with Google Maps picture and details of the watch's last recorded location.

The watch, which is also bust-proof (it sounds an alarm and sends a text if you try to take it off), shock and water proof. Parents will also need to pay £5 for a monthly subscription or maintenance fee.

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Our Comments

Well. Prisoners have electronic tags attached to their ankles to monitor their every move. Children may soon have electronic tags attached to their wrist for the same purpose. Maybe Lok8u could also launch an updated version which can tell parents whether their children have been drinking, taking drugs or having sex whilst outside, based on their heartbeats. But then again, those parents may be too busy with their own lives.

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