A Third Of UK Children Victims of Cyber-bullying

In what can be termed as a shocking finding, a research study has purported that one in every three children in UK has been a sufferer of bullying over the web.

The research study, commissioned by the charity Beatbullying, included 2,000 kids and teenagers across the UK, and revealed that intimidation had gradually entered the digital world through social networking websites, prank phone calls, and intimidating text messages.

Furthermore, the study has also sparked concerns over the issue of gender divide, claiming that girls are four times more vulnerable to face such abuse than boys.

However, another survey, conducted by the Teacher Support Network, disclosed that one in seven teachers has experienced “cyberbullying” from students.

The research work from Beatbullying was commissioned to mark the commencement of CyberMentors programme, a country-wide web-based peer mentoring social networking platform that has been backed the Prime Minister, Gordon Brown.

Backing the CyberMentors scheme in safeguarding children online, Mr Brown said in a statement, “Just as we wouldn’t let them go unsupervised in playgrounds or in youth clubs, so we must put in place the measures that we need to keep our children and young people safe online”.

Go To Page 2 for our comments and more related links

Our Comments

Bullying has always existed. However new technologies like the Internet and mobile phones have made bullies even more powerful. As noted by the study, bullying is no longer restricted to your neighbourhood or your school. With more children going online, it comes as no surprise that bullying on the web is so widespread.

Related Links

Third of children 'cyberbullied'

(Press Association)

One third of children have been the victim of internet bullies

(This Is London)

A third of kids face cyberbullying

(IT Pro)

One In Three Youngsters A `Cyber-Bullying` Victim

(Javno.hr)

One in three UK youngsters a cyber - bullying victim

(SBS)

Third of youngsters victims of cyberspace bullying

(Scotsman)