Google Gambles Heavily On Future Success Of Voice Search

Google believes that its voice search will play a crucial role in their future business growth plans and the search giant expects it to be a major factor in expanding the company presence in the mobile web in the next few months.

In a statement which gave strong hints at the strategy Google plans to follow in the mobile internet market, Vic Gundotra, the search giant’s VP for engineering said that “[Google] believes voice search is a new form of search and that it is core to our business.”

He went on to add that since the time the company launched the feature on several mobile platforms, the number of voice queries that it has been receiving has continuously been increasing at a very fast rate.

Incidentally when the service was first launched, it received a lot of criticism with users complaining about garbled search results and the inability of the software to accurately understand accents apart from American English.

However Gundotra scoffed away at accuracy related concerns by saying “We launched it on the iPhone and have seen a 15% jump in accuracy because, as more people use it, we collect more data and our accuracy gets better.”

Google is likely to have a few issues with the quality of search results given the amount of data Google has to sift though in order to create a coherent and audible search engine results page.

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Our Comments

We are rather dubious about the necessity and usefulness of voice search. Google could prove us wrong but given the fact that speech to text technology has been around for more than 20 years. However, most of the solutions - Dragon's Naturally Speaking and IBM's Via Voice for example - are still very much niche ones that have a steep learning curve.

Related Links

Google: voice search is 'core to business'

(Tech Radar)

Google talks up voice search

(IAB)

Google believes Voice Search is pretty important to business

(TechWhack)

Google Voice: A Dutiful but Klutzy Secretary

(The Wall Street Journal)