US Army Deploys Apple iPod Touch As Military Gear

Apple’s iPod Touch is turning out to be the product of choice to help US military personnel to interact effectively with other soldiers and intelligence resources in this era of “networked warfare”, a recent report in Newsweek suggested.

The report notified that the device performs a variety of functions, ranging from showing satellite imagery and directing the robots tailored to disable bombs to estimating the bullet trajectory and translating language.

In addition, the device also integrates apps that could help soldiers to add translated phrases and words on maps and images, and show video messages from local leaders to the villagers, the report added.

It further includes a new program, dubbed as ‘Vcommunicator’, which translates the written and spoken Kurdish, Arabic, and a couple of Afghan languages to help soldiers to counter in a better way.

Incidentally, in a bid to offer more functionality to iPod Touch devices, US Department of Defence and software developers are working closely to develop some useful military software for the device.

Furthermore, with a price tag worth $230, this blockbuster device from Apple is far cheaper than the other hardware and software applications being used by the US military, and thereby it could help the government to save a lot over its defence budget.

You can follow ITProPortal.com on Twitter @itproportal.

Our Comments

The US Military using Apple iPod Touch in enemy territories is a tribute to the design quality of the Cupertino-based device. Not only does it cut down the research and development costs but it also provides with an additional market for recession hit companies. Plus as an added benefit, soldiers will also be able to use the iPod Touch to watch movies and listen to music.

Related Links

U.S. military enlists iPod Touch for battlefield

(CNet)

Apps move to the US Battlefields

(iPhone Buzz)

iPod touch finding new niches in Afghanistan, Iraq

(Blorge)

Apple’s New Weapon

(Newsweek)

The Future of Networked Warfare Begins with Apple

(Read Write Web)