Amazing Radio Debuts in DAB

In a bid to promote fresh talent in the music industry, a new national digital audio broadcasting (DAB) station, tagged as “Amazing Radio”, has been launched that will play music by unregistered artists only.

However, the new service will replace the popular “Birdsong Channel”, which had been broadcasting for around 18 months and was launched to fill the vacant slot on a DAB station. Incidentally, the innovative Birdsong service managed to gain a substantial fan club, with around half a million people listened to it regularly.

Besides, the newly launched station will source its music from the tracks uploaded to the online music portal Amazingtunes.com, which was unleashed back in 2006 and currently holds as many as 1500 tracks in its archive.

If a web user selects and downloads any song from the website, then 70 percent of the download revenue goes to the related artist, which in turn offers new artists a chance to earn money from their tracks.

Amazing Radio will initially be available on trial basis for a period of six months on Digital One's national DAB radio channel, playing a mixture of rock, jazz, indie, urban, and pop music. Moreover, it will also become the third only digital channel on DAB network, alongside BFBS, a dedicated channel to armed forces, and Planet Rock.

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Our Comments

The radio will be able to give a voice to unsigned bands and could even partner with the likes of Last.fm or Myspace to unearth new singers or groups. Altogether, Amazing Radio has been a financial but also a human success and proves that DAB can work seamlessly within an online platform.

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