Nokia To Release Windows-based Netbook

Nokia has announced the release of its first Windows product, a netbook called Booklet 3G which is powered by an Atom processor, and comers nearly 19 years after the Finnish manufacturer sold its PC business.

The world's largest mobile phone manufacturer has managed to put together what it calls a "mini laptop" with some very attractive features; it is the first netbook to come with an aluminium chassis, Assisted GPS and a HDMI port.

The rest of its configuration is expected to be pretty much standard; a 10-inch glass screen that can display 1024x600 pixels, an Intel Atom processor, a webcam, Bluetooth, WiFi and built in 3G functionality as well as up to 12 hours worth of battery life.

"The computer will include a hard drive and a glass display capable of showing high-definition video, making it a higher-performance device than a stripped down netbook," said Kai Oeistaemoe, Executive Vice President of Devices for Nokia.

The netbook will run on Windows (probably XP SP3) and will be bundled with Nokia's own set of applications, OVI services. With a weight of 1.25Kg and a thickness of around 20mm, it should easily compete with the likes of Asus EEE series.

The Booklet 3G is expected to be formally announced at Nokia world on September 2nd with more details as to when it will be launched and at what price. We strongly believe that Nokia will be shoving truckloads of those at mobile network operators.

Our Comments

We're disappointed that Nokia chose to release a Windows-based netbook rather than being more bold and releasing one based on Maemo or Symbian S60. Rather than choosing to be different, Nokia has launched yet another netbook that will sooner or later be swamped by an onslaught of new models. We will bring you more about it.

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