Microsoft Target Malvertisers In Lawsuits

Microsoft Corp. seems all geared up to crack down on malicious advertising, as the software company has announced to take legal action against as many as five advertisers alleged with inserting ads containing malicious codes on web pages.

The software giant has filed suits in the US District Court in Washington against five anonymous individuals who have been accused for plaguing websites with malware applications by placing ads containing malware stuffs.

The suits accused that the individuals with business names Direct Ad, ITmeter INC, qiweroqw.com, ote2008.info, and Soft Solutions, have been using maladvertisement as a way to distribute malware applications across the web.

Dubbed as “maladvertising”, the process involves infesting legitimate pages with malicious codes that can insert malicious applications or programs on victim’s computer, help hackers to remotely execute codes on the victim’s computer.

Tim Cranton, associate general counsel with Microsoft, wrote in a blog post: “Microsoft works vigilantly, using both technology and the law, to fight illegal activity that undermines people’s trust in the Internet and online services.”

“Today's filings build on other recent actions we've taken against click fraud and instant messaging spam”, he added.

Furthermore, the company is suggesting users to do away with malicious attacks by employing the best practices, like using updated security tools and not revealing personal details to unknown sites.

Our Comments

This should send a strong message to those wishing to introduce malware on users' computers via advertising. How Microsoft is going to proceed in other countries though like Russia or North Korea remains to be seen.

Related Links

Microsoft sues over 'malicious' online advertising

(Associated Press)

Microsoft takes aim at shady advertisers

(V3.co.uk)

Microsoft Lawsuit Shows Malicious Advertising a Growing Issue

(eWeek)

Microsoft's 'Malvertising' Battle: A Tough Fight to Win

(PC World)

Malvertisers slapped by Microsoft lawsuits

(The Register)