Anti-piracy Plans To Cost Each ISP Customers £24 Per Year

Hitting back at the UK government’s proposed plans to crack down on internet piracy, BT has claimed that such measures could add an extra £25 a year to the bills of broadband customers in the country.

The business secretary Peter Mandelson is spearheading the proposed plans to put a check on internet piracy. This comes as another controversial levy on fixed telephone lines could add another £6 per year to bills.

BT’s consumer division head, John Petter, has claimed that the costs of such policing downloads could go up to a whopping £1 million a day, which in turn would presumably have a big bite off from the broadband providers’ profits.

Commenting upon the issue, Petter said that although the music industry carries the power to handle the issue, but they simply don’t want to affect their public image preferring to put the onus on ISPs.

Slamming the government’s proposals, he said in a statement: “It would cost millions and probably have very little impact as they [filesharers] would devise new ways to disguise what they're doing”.

A BT spokesperson asserted that the ISPs would be needed to cough up for integrating new technology into the network that could help tracking the illicit downloaders.

Other costs would comprise the costs of informing and educating internet users about the aftermaths of illegal downloading along with other required etiquettes.

Our Comments

The plans to stop downloaders are likely to fail at stopping piracy. After all, by the time this scheme gets up and running something else will be available (1024-bit Encrypted P2P solutions for example). If everything is lost, then there's still 50GB blank Blu-ray disks like in the old days.

Related Links

Piracy clampdown will cost each user £25

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Anti-piracy costs could outweigh industry losses

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Internet piracy policing could add £24 to every phone bill

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Broadband ISP BT Slams High Costs of Tackling Illegal UK Downloads

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Tackling piracy 'could increase broadband costs’

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