Microsoft Security Essentials Clocks More Than 1.5 Million Downloads In Seven Days

Microsoft Corp. has announced that some 1.5 million users across the globe have downloaded its security scanner software tool within the first week after the software - which is available for free - was shipped.

Microsoft Security Essentials has, until now, discovered around four million instances of some type of malware application on more than 500,000 different PCs within first seven-days of operation, after it was released on 29 September to 6 October.

In terms of the operating systems, around 44 percent of the total downloads of the software were to the machines running Windows 7, followed by XP with 33 percent, and Windows Vista with 23 percent.

However, the software giant asserted that the XP machines have had “far more” malware detections, while Windows 7 has shown the fewest. Microsoft Security Essentials will be available for free to all the legitimate Windows users and can be obtained here.

As per the countries, Trojans were the most prominent form of the malware content in the US, whereas China has had several instances of potentially useless software threats, and worms, particularly Conficker, were the most devastating entities in Brazil.

The company has boasted the security capabilities of Windows 7, which is slated to be launched this week, by saying, “this follows our usual observed trend of seeing less malware on newer OSes and service packs”.

Our Comments

Who wouldn't want a free security application? No wonder that MSE has been a real success until now and it is interesting to note that most of the downloads were done by Windows 7 owners - even if the operating system has yet to be officially launched.

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