Simplicity Computing Rolls Out Six Button PC For Elderly Users

In an attempt to attract the six million elderly people in the UK, Valerie Singleton, former Blue Peter presenter and co-founder of Discount Age along with Simplicity Computing, has launched a new computer called simplicITy on Tuesday.

The computer which runs on Linux operating system has only six buttons on its screen and it allows the elderly to effortlessly access their emails, watch videos and perform other tasks without getting hassled.

The simplicITy computer comes with 17 pre-loaded tutorial videos recorded by Valerie Singleton herself that are tailored to help a user in learning the basics of operating the system.

Explaining the rationale behind introducing the system, Wayne Cooper, the simplicITy project manager said in a statement that "Everyone has been focusing on the cutting edge and trendy things and the older generation have been left behind."

The company has launched two versions of SimplicITy computers and it claims that many nursing homes have been calling in, since its launch, to get it installed at community centers; in addition medical institutions from Germany, US and Canada have also approached the company.

The simplicITy desktop is being endorsed by charities like Age Concern and Help The Aged, who believe that anything that is designed to help the elderly in gaining economic and social independence should be supported.

Our Comments

There are potentially millions of users for the Simplicity PC. The initiative has to be praised but we are still not sure as to whether £530 wouldn't be better spent on a normal computer with Windows 7 Home Premium reconfigured with accessibility options switched on. Since the OS is virtually free, the company could be making very comfortable profit margins on this product.

Related Links

SimplicITy PC simplifies computing for over 50s

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SimplicITy is a Linux PC for the elderly

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Computing for older users: Patronising or practical?

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SimplicITy PC has simple interface aimed at seniors

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Valerie Singleton launches desktop computer

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