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EU Concerns Over Oracle-Sun Microsystems Acquisition Misguided Says SFL

SecurityNews
, 07 Dec 2009News

Software Freedom Law center, a non-profit software group, has sent a letter to the European Union regulators who are investigating Oracle’s proposal for acquiring Sun Microsystems; it says that the EU’s concerns about the open-source MySQL software are ‘misguided’.

European Union has recently presented a ‘State of Objections’ for Oracle’s acquisition of Sun Microsystems which highlights EU concerns over the fate of Sun’s open-source MySQL database software.

The latter is in direct competition with Oracle’s database software and EU regulators have expressed the possibility that Oracle will attempt to shut down MySQL after the acquisition.

The software group, which was founded by Eben Moglen, a Columbia University Law School professor, has explained in the letter that MySQL is protected by GNU General Public License (GPL) which protects open-source software even if its distribution rights are controlled by a company like Oracle. 

The letter refuted EU’s concerns that Oracle will use its powers as centralised copyright owner for MYSQL to go around GPL and said that the terms of GPL have proved strong against previous attempts to find a loophole in GPL laws. 

The letter also pointed out companies like IBM and Hewlett Packard have come to terms with working along side open-source software.

Our Comments

Lastly, the SFL center told the EU regulators that it was in Oracle’s best interest to keep MySQL up and running because apart from being a competitor of Oracle’s database software, MySQL will give Oracle an edge over Microsoft’s SQL Server database.

Related Links

Software Group Disputes E.U. Concerns About Oracle-Sun Deal

(Channel Web)

SFLC says GPL issues should not block Oracle's acquisition of Sun

(H Online)

Study: MySQL use to drop under Oracle ownership

(Computer World)

REFILE-Activist lawyer sees flaw in EU Oracle-Sun report

(Reuters)

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