Google Debuts Forest Monitoring Tool At Copenhagen

Google has revealed revolutionary new technology at the International Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen which is designed to monitor changes in rainforests all over the world.

The prototype is aimed at halting the devastation of rain forests by monitoring emissions from tropical deforestation and curtailing global warming.

The project, initiated by Google, is based on Google Earth’s satellite images to pin-point the areas where deforestation is taking place.

Google’s cloud computing technology has powered the computational analysis of images taken via Google earth to compare forest cover of areas to determine the rate of deforestation.

Google, in order to develop the technology had collaborated with Greg Asner of Carnegie Institution for Science and Carlos Souza of Imazon.

Interestingly, the same technology developed by Greg Asner and Carlos Souza was being used to monitor deforestation in Latin America. However, the development was slow due to the unavailability of quality satellite images and the computer power required for data analysis.

But now, with Google supplying the necessary technology, the prototype will be supporting United Nation’s framework called Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries.

The framework will provide rainforest nations with financial support to monitor deforestation and they will also be required to dish-out an annual report.

Our Comments

Google is doing a good job via its philanthropic arm, Google.org. It has a number of grants for non profit organization, Google PowerMeter and the Flu trends. There's also the many public service announcement adverts that appear on blank ad spots.

Related Links

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