Facebook Boots Out Web 2.0 Suicide Machine Service

Facebook announced on Monday that it has forbidden a popular online portal that helps users delete their social networking profiles without taking too much of pain.

In a move that could presumably create problems for users seeking to get rid of their social networking profiles, the world’s largest social networking site has blocked the access of a website, named “Web 2.0 Suicide Machine”, to its massive user base.

That’s not just it, as the social networking giant has also reportedly sent a “cease and desist” missive to another such service, namely “Seppukoo.com”, which also assists users prune their social network identities.

The Web 2.0 Suicide Machine website, the homepage of which showcases a hangman’s noose, has been helping users in deleting their profile details, friends, and other related info on a range of social networking websites, including MySpace, Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

Asserting on the uselessness of such a service, Facebook said: “Facebook provides the ability for people who no longer want to use the site to either deactivate their account or delete it completely. Web 2.0 Suicide Machine collects login credentials, which is a violation of our Statement of Rights and Responsibilities (SRR)”.

This move from Facebook could mark the beginning of a new trend that would see other social networking portals, like MySpace and Twitter, killing off access of such profile obliterating services to their platforms.

Our Comments

Is Facebook playing with fire here? The details uploaded by the users to Facebook still remain theirs as far as the law is concerned. Should they want to use another service to delete their accounts, they ought to be allowed to do so without any obstacles.

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Facebook cuts off Suicide Machine access

(CNet)

Facebook blocks social network 'suicide' website

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