Tories To Give £1m For UK Citizen Crowdsourcing Project

The Conservative Party is looking ahead to "harness the collective wisdom" of the UK people to formulate efficacious policies, as the party has set a £1 million award for making a system that could make the act of policy-making more transparent.

The Party has vowed to offer £1 million of the taxpayers' money to the developer who could develop a website that would provide a platform to UK citizens to share their views on crucial public matters online.

The website also envisaged to garner the shared insight of the voters that could prove to be instrumental in finding the solutions to some of the "common problems" the country is facing.

In order to be eligible for the prize, the developers must produce a website on which voters could post their suggestions and views over the government’s decisions on various matters.

However, the most essential condition for such an award is that the Conservative Party should win the general elections to be held in 2010.

The platform would presumably employ crowdsourcing to assess the government policies, including handling government’s wastes, devising planning strategy for a local area, avoiding roadworks, as well as finding the best institutions and schools.

Touting the announcement, the shadow culture secretary Jeremy Hunt said "There are currently no technological platforms that enable in-depth online collaboration on the scale required by government – this prize is a good and cost-effective way of getting one".

Our Comments

This is big and something that could possibly change the way traditional democracy works by giving millions of voters direct access to their MPs and long term strategies and plans, at least in the conservative party.

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