20,000 Google Nexus One Handsets Sold To Date?

All the hype surrounding Google’s venture into the smartphone arena with its newcomer Google Nexus One handset has apparently not been able to attract that many eager customers, according to its first week sales as estimated by the research firm Flurry.

The analytic firm has reported that only around 20,000 units of the handset have been sold during the first week of its release.

The sales figure seems to be considerably modest when compared against the first week sales of 250,000 units of Motorola Droid, an Android-powered handset released in November on Verizon Wireless, as well as 60,000 units of T-Mobile myTouch 3G, another Android-powered device.

Furthermore, the sales count is minuscule when put against the first week sales figure of Apple’s blockbuster iPhone 3GS, which stood at a whopping 1.6 million units in its first week of launch.

The lukewarm start of the handset will possibly increase the level of scepticism about the search engine giant’s venture into retailing; Google decided to sidestep the exclusive carrier stores and depend on its own marketing instead.

As of now, Google is offering the unlocked version of the smartphone for $529, while it comes with a price tag of $179 when purchased along with a 2-year T-Mobile contract, exclusively through the search giant’s website.

Our Comments

Commenting upon Google’s lack of experience in retailing, Peter Farago, marketing director at Flurry, said: “While this distribution strategy is among the most innovative facets of the Nexus One launch, and a threat to carrier control of the consumer relationship, a series of customer service and other mistakes reveal Google’s lack of retail experience”.

Related Links

Google Nexus One Sales Off to a Slow Start

(The Wall Street Journal)

Google's Nexus One Hit by Slow Sales

(PC Magazine)

Google Nexus One's First Week Sales Weak

(Techtree)

Google Sells Only 20,000 Nexus Ones in Week 1

(eWeek)

Google Nexus One's First Week of Sales Were Weak, Report says

(PC World)