UK Government Enrolls DirectGov To Combat Terrorism Online

The UK Government is buckling up to crack down hard on terrorist websites distributing messages of hatred and information on perilous techniques by using crowdsourcing techniques.

The UK Home Office has created a dedicated page for the cause on its website DirectGov, where concerned and responsible netizens can report about the websites spreading content pertaining to extremism.

The programme is a part of UK Government’s proposal to put into effect the Terrorism Acts of 2000 and 2006, under the aegis of which sharing information intended for encouraging terrorism, as well as glorifying extremism and convincing people to commit terrorism is illegitimate.

Citizens can report about the terrorism related content on the web by filing up a web-based form on DirectGov, which includes categories to elaborate what’s there on the website, like “hate crimes” or content relating to “terrorist training material”.

Web content regarded as illegitimate involves videos showing beheadings and other such heinous slaughters, messages promoting terrorist or racial violence, along with online forums surrounding hate crimes, as published on the DirectGov website.

The Government further constituted a new Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU), managed by the Association of Chief Police Officials (ACPO), which will be responsible handle tip-offs from people about the alleged terrorism promoting sites.

Our Comments

Announcing the move, Lord West said, the Security Minister, said: “We want to protect people who may be vulnerable to violent extremist content and will seek to remove any unlawful material.” before adding that “The internet is not a lawless forum and should reflect the legal and accepted boundaries of society”.

Related Links

UK Government Enlists Public to Spot Terror Web Sites

(PC World)

Directgov battles terrorism with report-a-website page

(Register)

Web call for terror alerts

(Inquirer)

Home Office targets terror-related websites

(BBC)

Police unit targets terror websites

(Press Association)