Google Launches Corporate Apps Marketplace

Search engine mogul Google has unveiled its brand new Google Apps Marketplace, which will offer applications developed by other vendors for enterprise use and will be integrated with Google Apps and Google's cloud storage service.

The new Google Apps Marketplace, which was rolled out on Tuesday, is designed to take on Microsoft which offers similar business enterprise offerings and online collaboration tools.

According to the Google Apps Marketplace website, the online store will offer web based online collaboration and communication tools to businesses, in order to increase their productivity and efficiency.

Interestingly, Google Apps has become quite popular with enterprise users, who use Google Apps like Gmail, Google Talk, Google Docs and Google Calender, word processing, spreadsheet and presentation.

The new Marketplace will be offering web based enterprise software that integrates nicely with Google Apps and the cloud service offered by the company.

As of now, the Apps Marketplace features applications developed by 50 companies that are designed to work with Google's cloud based software services.

The Google Apps Marketplace, which has an estimated 25 million users, features popular Software-as a-service apps including Manymoon, a social productivity and task management tool, Aviary Design Suite and Tripit travel organiser.

You can find more about the service here and you will need to be a Google Apps customer (even the free version) to be able to test them.

Our Comments

Some of the companies that are participating in the Marketplace are Intuit, eFax, Fresh Books, zoho and Vertical Response. Think of the Apps marketplace as an iTunes for businesses except that they will be getting cool applications for their businesses. Microsoft will be watching very, very closely.

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