UK Government To Give Brits Online Dashboard

The UK Labour government has launched its new 'MyGov' initiative which will allow UK citizens to access a host of government services like tax payment and password application, from a single 'dashboard' or a online service, similar to today's internet banking and online shopping services.

The announcement was made by Prime Minister Gordon Brown, who also outlined the government's Digital Britain vision which involves the availability of high-speed internet with speeds of 100-Mbps across Britain.

Commenting on the merits of Labour's Britain wide roll out of high-speed broadband, Jim Knight, the minister involved with the planning process, told the BBC that “By having universal access to this very high bandwidth which allows more streaming video, allows people to watch TV and listen to radio online, it means that we can also release the business and employment potential of this.”

Prime Minister Brown, in his speech, which incidentally received a mixed response from the press and the public, also announced the creation of a £30 million Web Science institute to be headed by the founder of the world wide web, Sir Tim Berners-Lee.

The government added that apart from offering government services the MyGov government services dashboard will also let citizens to keep a track of their pensions and medical reports, pay council tax, book hospital appointments and apply to the schools of their choice.

Our Comments

We're not sure about the very need for such a service. It does have its pros but we have a feeling that it will not be used by many. The current governmental portal, direct.gov.uk, is currently the 36th biggest website in the UK, great until you see that both Partypoker and pornhub.com are above it.

Related Links

Gordon Brown's super-fast broadband for all plan

(BBC)

Broadband and personalised services online for all, says Brown

Telegraph)

Gordon Brown: superfast broadband vital to prevent 'digital divide'

(Guardian)

Brown creates one UK.gov website to rule them all

(The Register)