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Invisage Promises To Make Image CMOS Obsolete With Quantum Tech

Business & GovernmentNews
, 22 Mar 2010News

InVisage Technologies, a US based IT company, has devised a new image sensor used in mobile phone cameras which is based on quantum dots instead of silicon, enhancing the quality of the photographs in the process.

According to a statement released by the company, the technology developed by it has the capability of increasing the performance of the sensors by more than 4 times, allowing cameras in mobile phones to snap high-quality photos.

Jess Lee, the CEO and President of the company, commenting on the sensor technology, said in a statement that “We have all heard ‘Gee, I wish the camera on my iPhone was better.' But the heart of the problem is in the heart of the camera, which is the sensor.”

He explained that cameras in today's mobile phones are powered by Charged-Couple device (CCD) or Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) sensors which contain silicon equipped image sensors with the ability to absorb only 50 percent of the light. 

The image sensors are further equipped with a layer of copper and aluminium circuits, resulting in poor quality images.

The company said in the statement that the quantum dots are created from nanocrystals made out of a special kind of semiconductors, allowing manufacturers to maintain a high level of control over the image sensors and are about 90 efficient in absorbing light.

Our Comments

This technology could have major implications for the entry level imaging technology. But until we actually see a proper product that uses the technology, we'll have our doubts. There's also the afct that other stand alone cameras may also adopt the technology.

Related Links

Quantum Technology Promises Wedding Photos From Phone Cameras

(Wired)

Quantum film threatens to replace CMOS image chips

(EE Times)

Quantum film might replace CMOS

(The Inquirer)

New tech promises DSLR quality pics from iPhone

(Tech Radar)

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