Tories Cash Gordon Website Gets Hacked

UK's Conservative party has been left red faced after hackers exploited a loophole on its 'Cash Gordon' website, redirecting users to pornographic websites, forcing the party to take the website down.

According to security experts, the developers who created the website, apparently forgot to add basic security measures on the website, thereby allowing hackers to use the party's extensive web campaign against it.

The web site, 'Cash Gordon', was launched by the Conservatives in order to make the public focus on the level of influence Unite, the trade union behind the British Airways strike, has on the Labour government headed by Prime Minister Gordon Brown, after it donated £11 million to the party.

Commenting on the issue, a party representative said in a statement that “We’ve made the necessary adjustments to the site and the #CashGordon campaign has now led to many thousands people hearing about Unite’s funding stranglehold over the Labour Party.”

Originally, the Conservative party had intended to spread the word about Gordon Brown's indebtedness to Unite by using social media tools like Twitter, allowing users to post Tweets which contained '#cashgordon' in every message posted.

Hackers exploited this loophole by adding their own web codes along with the hash tag, redirecting users to pornographic websites whenever they clicked on the link.

Our Comments

Oh well, may they learn from their mistakes. There are times when one has to wonder whether politics and technology can mix. That said, President Obama showed what can be done with a sleek web machinery. We've got a hunch that this won't be the alst one we hear about something like this.

Related Links

Conservatives embarrassed as hackers exploit loophole on anti-union website

(Telegraph)

Tory online experiment foiled as hackers crash ‘Cash Gordon’ website

(Times Online)

Conservatives' 'Cash Gordon' web campaign backfires

(Guardian)

CashGordon.com is hacked by Labour stooges – the online election gets nasty

(Telegraph)