OCZ launches quiet PSUs for enthusiasts

OCZ may have shut down its Hypersonic PC business a couple of months ago, but it looks as though the PSU business that it purchased with PC Power & Cooling is still going strong.

The company has just released a new line-up of Silencer Mk II PSUs for enthusiasts and gamers wanting to keep down the noise of their rigs.

At the top of the stack is a 950W model, which has already been decorated with the 80plus Silver badge with its measured efficiency of 88 percent. This unit is particularly aimed at those with multi-GPU gaming setups, featuring six PCI-E power connectors (three six-pin, and three eight-pin) and a massive 83.4A +12V rail.

A notch down is the 750W version, which features a slightly smaller 62.4A +12V rail, and four PCI-E connectors (two six-pin and two eight-pin. Meanwhile, the 650W model has just two PCI-E connectors (one six-pin and one eight-pin) and a 54A +12V rail. Both units still maintain the 88 per cent efficiency of the 950W model, and similarly feature the 80plus Silver medal.

Finally, at the bottom of the pile is the 500W model, which features a much smaller 36A +12V rail, and comes with two PCI-E power connectors. Unlike the other models, the 500W unit has a measured efficiency of 85 percent, which earns it an 80plus Bronze award, rather than the silver badge worn by its brothers.

All of the PSUs in the line-up feature a large 135mm fan with two ball bearings, which is designed to shift as much air as possible without sounding like a wind turbine. OCZ claims that the 950W model generates between 25 and 37 dB(A) of noise depending on its workload, making it quieter than the 26-41dB(A) of its 910W predecessor in the original Silencer line-up.

OCZ’s director of product management, Ryan Edwards, claims that the new PSUs offer “a perfect blend of proven, long-term technology and the newest cutting-edge design.”

By combining OCZ’s knowledge of the enthusiast business with PC Power & Cooling’s knowledge of powering servers, OCZ says that the new line-up “strikes the right balance between standard, server-class topology and state-of-the-art PSU architecture,” adding that they’re “designed with enthusiasts and power-users in mind.”

There’s no word on pricing or availability yet, but the 910W original Silencer currently goes for £120, so we’d expect the top-end 950W to cost just a few quid more.