Geforce GTX 570 arrives

Earlier today, Tech Report jumped the gun and upped its own review of the second-fiddle Geforce GTX 570. It was quick in pulling the article as Nvidia PR quickly homed in on the source and pointed out the NDA clauses.

Just now, the NDA has expired and all sorts of reviews can now be had for a quick browse. While Nvidia has not sought to send us a sample unit, we can rely on the diligent efforts of our colleagues around the world.

The Geforce GTX 570 is, in essence, a slightly cut-down GTX 580 with a reduced number of CUDA cores (480 instead of 512) and a tighter memory bus (320-bits instead of 384-bits). Aside from this, it is cut from the same GF110 silicon as the GTX 580 and features, for the most part, the same optimisations of the second-generation Fermis. Looking at the reference design, you won't see much difference to the GTX 580, except maybe the dual 6-pin PEG connectors instead of 6+8-pin connectors.

Like the last generation of GPUs in both camps, Nvidia has sought to reduce power consumption substantially on this kit, compared to its rather 'unrefined' predecessor, the GTX 470. The inclusion of stricter power regulation and monitoring has allowed Nvidia to lower both idle and load power considerably while keeping things overclocking-safe.

So how does it perform? Well, if benchmarking is anything to go by, it performs on par with the GTX 480, Nvidia's previous flagship. Considering the GTX 570 comes in at $50 and a handful of watts less, it seems like it's a good option if you can't go all the way for the higher-priced GTX 580.

It might be a bit risky for Nvidia to go full out on its higher-performing cards without seeing what AMD has in stock with the Cayman chips. A launch at this price range with an upcoming 'contender' might be very dangerous and see Nvidia ringing up partners offering discounted stock as soon as Cayman is out. Or not.

Pricing for the GTX 570 currently stands at £300/$350/€349.