Photos : LG Optimus Pad Tablet

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The LG unveiled the Optimus Pad tablet at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, one which is the company's third device to run on the Nvidia Tegra 2 SoC.

Its main forte is its 15:9, 8.9-inch screen which is smaller than that of the iPad's 9.7-inch model but still manages to cram 1280x768 pixels, making it the smallest mainstream HD ready tablet on the market.

Apart from the 1GHz Nvidia Tegra 2 SoC, there's a two megapixel front facing camera for video conferencing and two stereoscopic dual five-megapixel cameras with flash which means that you will be able to record in 3D but not play it back on the tablet's screen.

At 630g, it weighs slightly less than the Apple iPad and does support 3G, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth; in addition, the LG Optimus Pad has 1GB RAM, 32GB onboard storage with a microSD card reader and is powered by Android 3.0 Honeycomb.

LG says that the size makes it ideal for one hand holding although we're not sure whether we'd do that. Another significant omission (in a good way) is the lack of buttons on the front facia which means that any input has to be done through the touchscreen.