Pictures : Sony Ericsson Neo, The New Vivaz

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We sat down with Maiko Ishida, the Product Manager in charge of the Neo yesterday at Sony Ericsson's event to discuss how the phone will be positioned in Sony Ericsson's new line up.

Unlike the rest of the new SE range, the Neo doesn't have any glaring unique selling point; the arc is slim and has a big screen, the Play is the playstation phone and the Pro has a keyboard.

The Neo by comparison is quite mundane, which according to Ishida, would ironically make it a great seller given that the majority of smartphone users don't look for anything spectacular.

Like the Vivaz, the Neo has a peculiar form factor but has shed the Symbian OS for Android 2.3 instead. For the rest, you get a 1Ghz Qualcomm processor, the same as the Xperia Play, a 3.7-inch WVGA screen as the Pro, a front facing camera, an 8-megapixel camera like the arc, complemented by the Exmor R and the Mobile Bravia Engine.

Oh and Ishida, who worked on Timescape, tells us that the new user interface/social media aggregator works much better than before, without any noticeable lag.