Pictures : Apple MacBook Pro 17-inch MC725B (2011 Edition)

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We managed to get our hands of the most expensive MacBook Pro on the market, the one that was just announced this morning; the MC725B otherwise known as the 17-inch MBP, one which currently costs £2099 for the entry level one.

Upgrading the processor to a 2.3Ghz Quad Core model will add another £200; doubling the onboard memory up to 8GB will cost £160 more.

When it comes to onboard storage, users will be able to swap the 750GB hard disk drive for a 500GB model for no fee and they will lose in capacity what they will get in speed (5400RPM vs 7200RPM).

Swapping a traditional hard disk drive for a SSD however will cost up to £880 (for the 512GB model). The MBP still doesn't support dual drives configuration.

Other options include going for an antiglare widescreen display (+£40) and a mini display to DVI adapter (+£25).

We will check out later whether the 17-inch MBP is actually worth it compared to the previous generation.