Intel's vPro suffix businesses up Sandy Bridge

Intel recently decided to call its new line of chips based on the Sandy Bridge architecture the '2nd generation Intel Core vPro processor family'.

Daft name.

It's now unveiled its Sandy Bridge line aimed at businesses and stuck a vPro in the title so that we'll all be able to tell the difference.

Another slight difference between this line of chips and the other lot is that they should work. That is, Intel has fixed the chipset problems that dogged that launch of its '2nd generation Intel Core processor family' (sigh) so that the '2nd generation Intel Core processor vPro family' (oh lordy) won't fall over when used in anger.

The vPro line also sports a bunch of features with which to woo businesses, not least in the area of security

According to Rick Echevarria, vice president of Intel's Architecture Group, and general manager of its Business Client Platform Division the new Intel Core vPro processor family "readies businesses for major changes to come in such areas as desktop virtualization, cloud computing and the complementary relationship between PCs and the growing variety of other computing devices.”

Intel claims a Vpro Core i5 is up to 60 per cent faster than a three-year old Intel Core 2 Duo processor. It reckons it will boost multi-tasking by 100 per cent and data encryption by 300 per cent. The performance improvements are due its Turbo Boost Technology 2.0 and Advanced Vector Extensions (AVX), Intel claims.

“The new Core vPro processor family has the capacity to offload tasks or even better share them to get the most from companion devices,” said Echevarria

Intel's revamped Anti-Theft Technology - version 3.0 - means a lost or stolen computer can now be locked by SMS message as soon as it is turned on. It can be re-activated with another message should it turn up again. A new Locator Beacon capability also means it can be located using GPS technology if you have teh right sort of 3G modem.

New Intel Identity Protection Technology is integrated into Intel's Core and Core vPro processors (henceforth, Sandy Nuts) which generates a new six-digit numerical password every 30 seconds to help ensure only authorised access, apparently

Finally, a new host-based configuration feature automates the process of setting up the vPro functions on new PCs, Intel said.

The chip maker said the likes of Dell, Fujitsu, HP and Lenovo are introducing new laptop, convertible-tablet, desktop and all-in-one PCs for businesses based on vPro Sandy Nutters.

The firm also said it is currently wrapping up a line of Xeon E3-1200s processors to bring Sandy Nuts to entry-level workstations soon and will add vPro technology to those too.