Google, Flurry And Mobclix Sued Over Tracking Code In Android Apps

Search giant Google, along with two other advertising metrics companies were dragged into the court last week in San Jose, California for allegedly placing device identification and location data numbers, as well as for harvesting a malware code that reports metrics.

The lawsuit was filed on behalf of plaintiff Juliann King, and it alleges that Google, along with Flurry and Mobclix were indulging in unlawful activity under the provision of both the Federal Computer Fraud Law, and the California laws for digital crime and business conduct.

According to the complainants, there are authenticated apps in the Google Android OS platform which feature embedded code for “information harvesting”, and that they keep tracking and sending key user-information including their physical locations, unique mobile identifiers etc. This in return, as claimed in the lawsuit, gives a further and more solid platform for the company to profile and individually identify users.

Google, till now remains unaffected by the stand taken by some of its rivals including Microsoft Corp., that has every now and then raised its voice in support of Do-Not-Track laws.

However, according to experts, this is not at all surprising, as the search giant, to quite an extent, if not heavily, relies on the utility of aggregated anonymous data to fund, and improve their free services.