China Rejects Google’s Hacking Allegations

The Chinese government has denied any involvement in the recent cyber attack on Gmail, calling Google’s allegations ‘unacceptable’.

The search engine giant had launched a fresh controversy by claiming that Chinese hackers had stolen Gmail log-in credentials belonging to several US and South Korean government officials and Chinese human rights activists.

A spokesperson for the Chinese foreign ministry dismissed the attacks as an international incident and claimed that people accusing the Chinese government had ‘ulterior motives’.

“Blaming these misdeeds on China is unacceptable," Hong Lei, a Chinese foreign ministry spokesman said during a press conference in Beijing.

"Hacking is an international problem and China is also a victim. The claims of so-called Chinese state support for hacking are completely fictitious and have ulterior motives." he added.

Google had said that it had traced the phishing attacks on Gmail accounts to the Jinan, the capital of Shandong province in China.

“Google detected and has disrupted this campaign to take users' passwords and monitor their emails. We have notified victims and secured their accounts. In addition, we have notified relevant government authorities,” the company said in a blog post.

China has repeatedly been named as the source of several cyber attacks in the past, including the Aurora attack on Google and other US companies. China has also been accused of hacking into the networks of major oil and gas companies to steal their intellectual property.