Late News: Objections Against Facebook Facial Recognition, Apple Settles Patent Dispute With Nokia, Facebook IPO

A group of privacy advocates has filed a complaint with the US Federal Trade Commission, urging the regulator to ban Facebook’s new face recognition service. Electronic Privacy Information Centre, the Centre for Digital Democracy, Consumer Watchdog and the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse have asked the FTC to review the new Facebook feature and subsequently prevent the company from rolling it out as it breaches user privacy.

Draft legislation currently being proposed in Washington would require companies which have been the victim of hacks involving the exposure of private data to confess the attack to a government agency within 48 hours.

US government officials have decided to perform a security review of websites hosted on Senate.gov server after it faced a cyber attack by hacker group LulzSec. LulzSec had hacked into the server both for its own amusement and to showcase the network's weak security. It then posted some data online on its website to prove its hack had been successful.

Apple has decided to settle its long-running patent dispute with Nokia by paying the Finnish mobile phone maker millions of dollars in licensing fees. Nokia had filed a patent infringement complaint with the US Federal Trade Commission, accusing Apple of violating 24 of its patents a year and a half ago. The company had also demanded that the FTC ban Apple from selling the iPhone in the US.

Facebook might launch an initial public offering in the first quarter of 2012, at a market valuation of more than $100 billion. Citing people familiar with the matter, CNBC reports that the company will probably be forced to go public in the first quarter of 2012 due to a section of the Securities and Exchange Act.