Hacker at Black Hat Conference Hacks Into His Own Insulin Pump to Demonstrate Product Flaws

Earlier this month during the Black Hat conference, a cybersecurity expert from Idaho demonstrated to the world how he hacked into an insulin pump embedded in his body and force the device to display incorrect readings.

The hacker, however, did not reveal the name of the insulin pump maker as he wanted to ensure the company came up with a solution first before he disclosed the name.

Jerome Redcliffe, the genius behind this rather skillful exploitation has finally revealed the name of the company as Medtronic. According to Redcliffe, he had approached Medtronic bosses to notify them about the flaws; only to be given what he calls a rather disappointing response.

"We talk about ethical disclosure, but we don't really talk about ethical response," Radcliffe said, according to an eWeek report.

Radcliffe however, has never revealed how he breached his own device. But following the discovery, he has reportedly switched his brand to “a competing pump made by Johnson & Johnson. He urged patients with Medtronic pumps to continue using the devices, and acknowledged that the threat of hacking is small,” he said as reported by the Star Tribune.