Fired Windows Phone manager Marini heads to Google

Joe Marini, the principal programme manager at Microsoft who leaked details regarding partner Nokia's flagship Windows Phone handset and was subsequently fired, has found a new home: shilling for his ex-employer's biggest rival, Google.

Marini, principal programme manager at Microsoft for the company's Windows Phone product, was caught in unguarded moment on microblogging site Twitter when he posted a teaser regarding the as-yet unnanounced device that would become the Nokia Lumia 800.

"I just got a chance to try out one of the slickest looking #Nokia phones I have ever seen," Marini burbled away to his followers. "Soon, you will too!"

Pressed for details, Marini explained that the device wasn't the all-singing, all-dancing flagship phone the ailing Nokia truly needed to revive its flagging fortunes. "Overall, I would say an 8," he added. "Solid feel, good camera, responsive UI, and nice little touches on the body construction. The camera was good, but didn't have optimal lighting. I'd like a larger screen, too."

Eight out of a possible ten proved too much criticism for Microsoft, which demonstrated its commitment to partner Nokia by sacking Marini a few days later. While the company refused to discuss the reason for his departure, the timing seems clear: if you're less than glowing about a partner's products, expect to hit the road.

Thankfully, the story has a happy ending: Marini has resumed posting to Twitter, breaking his professional silence with confirmation that he's now working for Microsoft's biggest rival in the mobile space, Google.

"I'm excited to be starting my new role at Google," he posted late last night, "driving the Web forward, and to continuing to work with the amazing people I've met!"

Referring to his departure from Microsoft as "a blog entry for another time," Marini hasn't clarified his precise role at the advertising giant, but it seems likely he will be working on Google's Android mobile platform - a role in direct competition with his ex-colleagues back at Microsoft's Windows Phone division.

Neither Google nor Microsoft provided comment on Marini's latest career move.