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NAND price drops to improve SSD uptake, says Kingston

HardwareNews
by Staff Writer
, 25 Nov 2011News

Kingston Technology believes that the falling price of NAND memory and the continuing shortage of hard disk drives (HDDs) will help contribute to a large increase in the uptake of newer, faster solid-state disks (SSDs) in 2012. 

While offering vastly superior performance, pricey SSD storage devices have been considered a premium piece of hardware over the past couple of years. However, with prices gradually decreasing and the introduction of technology like TRIM improving the life of the products, they've become increasingly popular.

Despite a steady rise in uptake, though, Nathan Su at Kingston Technology believes that when NAND flash memory pricing falls to $1 per gigabyte, we will see the largest replacement of HDDs in consumer systems. This is predicted to happen towards the third quarter of 2012, though it seems likely that SSD purchasing will continue to increase through the earlier parts of the year thanks to a current shortage and price increases of traditional hard drives, following supply problems as a result of flooding in Thailand, where many of the worl'd hard disks are made.

Su also explained to Digitimes that the transition for manufacturers down to a 19nm fabrication process will help the gradual price decline, as the current generation of chips and its manufacturing process are what's slowed the cost reductions of SSDs in the past couple of years.

Of course, not missing an opportunity to tout the company's products, Su also discussed how Kingston had enhanced its SSD product range to be applicable for entry and medium range buyers, not just high end gamers and professionals.

He also talked about Kingston's new line-up of external drives, which are designed to expand the storage capacity of mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones. The Wi-Drive, for example, was developed specifically to accompany Apple's line-up of mobile products, including the iPod, iPad and iPhone.





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