Apple Provides Free Marketing for Samsung's iPad Rival

Samsung and Apple have been bickering for months, trying to ban one another from selling products in various countries, making accusations of patent infringement and so on.

But every cloud has a silver lining, or, in the case of Samsung - every lawsuit has a golden marketing opportunity!

Samsung Australia's vice president of telecommunications, Tyler McGee, has thanked Apple for its legal war against them, saying it has "certainly made the Galaxy Tab a household name," and had achieved more than the "investment that we would've put into it from a marketing perspective."

The statement comes immediately after the Australian court ruled in favour of Samsung Electronics and against Apple, thus enabling Samsung to sell its Android tablets this Christmas across Australia.

As BGR reports, Samsung have even used their high-profile court case to market the Galaxy Tab, hailing it as "THE TABLET APPLE TRIED TO STOP".

The Galaxy Tab 10.1 is an interesting competitor; it sports Google's Android system, is lighter and even thinner than the iPad 2. Nevertheless the Cupertino-based company claimed that Samsung was copying its products, namely its iPad and iPhone.

Apple also sued Samsung in the United States, claiming pretty much the same thing: that the product design, user interface and style of packing of Samsung Galaxy devices all copy ostensibly the iPhone and the iPad.

Even so, Apple doesn't seem to be having much luck in its pursuit of Samsung. Recently, a US court decided that Samsung was free to sell its Galaxy Devices throughout the U.S., a decision that prompted analysts to suggest things are moving in the right direction for Samsung.

Many people still have a hard time understanding the feud between the two companies, but it doesn't take a genius to figure it out. While Samsung is the world's top leading smartphone maker, it finds itself some way behind as far as tablets are concerned. Samsung has been desperately trying to close the gap, but the legal battles have been making it hard to do just that. Until now.