Pinterest Addresses Copyright Fears with Opt-out Code

In an attempt to shrug away any copyright infringement charges that may be in the making, the virtual pinboard site, Pinterest, has made available a line of code that will enable concerned sites to opt-out from being featured on the site.

The site came under scrutiny earlier in the month after it had refused to disclose its potential monetisation efforts and allegedly pocketed revenues by messing around with the links included in the user posts on the site, known as ‘pins'.

The site also made it clear that from now on, in order to share any images using Pinterest, the user must be having the ownership of those images, or at least manage permission from the original owner of the image.

Meanwhile, Pinterest is also reportedly planning to enforce a 500 character max limit for captions associated with individual pins - a move that experts believe has been aimed at reducing the stealing of excerpts from others' blog posts.

"We care about respecting the rights of copyright holders," said Ben Silbermann, Pinterest co-founder. He further added that the company works hard "to follow the [Digital Millennium Copyright Act] DMCA procedure for acting quickly when we receive notices of claimed copyright infringement."

Still in its invitation-only phase, Pinterest is no doubt climbing the ladder at a steady pace in terms of mass-appeal. Its user base increased almost exponentially in the past few months and now it boasts over 11 million users in the US alone.

[Source: VentureBeat, BBC News]