KONY 2012 Viral Campaign: The Real Deal, Or Just Another Scam?

As many social networkers will be well aware, the past few days has seen a lot of coverage over Invisible Children and its KONY 2012 documentary. Some positive, some negative, the jury's out on whether the intentions are for better - or for worse.

Up until a few days ago, I had never heard of Joseph Kony and non-profit organisation, Invisible Children - but thanks to a little thing called the Internet, suddenly my news feed was crammed with update upon update over KONY 2012 along with words of support for the charity. However, reports soon surfaced that all that glitters was not Kony - with the efforts of Invisible Children tarnished by the onslaught of the Internet brigade condeming the charity's budget: with just 32 per cent spent by Invisible Children put towards fundraising.

A Tumblr blog called Visible Children revealed details of the KONY 2012 campaign, highlighting a few points worth considering:

“Invisible Children has been condemned time and time again. As a registered not-for-profit, its finances are public. Last year, the organization spent $8,676,614. Only 32% went to direct services, with much of the rest going to staff salaries, travel and transport, and film production. This is far from ideal, and Charity Navigator rates their accountability 2/4 stars because they haven’t had their finances externally audited. But it goes way deeper than that.”

However, it doesn't look like Invisible Children will be taking this attack lying down - responding with its own comments:

“In response to this explosion of interest about the Kony 2012 film, there have been hundreds of thousands of comments in support of the arrest of Joseph Kony and the work of Invisible Children. However, there have also been a few pieces written that are putting out false or mis-leading information about these efforts."

They say seeing is believing, but it looks like we'll need to see a lot more before we can make a judgment call on this movement.