Google Claims UK Copyright System is Flawed

Google, as well as a number of other heavyweight institutions, have lent their backing to a letter penned to The Times newspaper. Criticising the UK's current copyright legislation, the letter strongly urges the government to acknowledge the recommendations as set out in the independent report into a review of the UK's copyright system published by Professor Hargreaves back in May 2011.

The correspondence was published in today's publication of The Times, which was signed by UK marketing director at Google, Dan Cobley - as well as a plethora of high profile names, such as creator of Father Ted, Graham Linehan; and chief executive of the British Library, Dame Lynne Brindley.

"Our copyright system is flawed. It limits growth, puts our cultural heritage at risk, holds back scientific discovery, and stifles our country's great comedic tradition of parody," stated the letter.

"As the law stands, transferring music from a CD to an MP3 player for your own use is illegal. Based on a real case, the inventor of a British iPod would attract legal threats instead of investment...

"By making everyday private copying of the music, films and e-books consumers have paid for legal, copyright law will regain relevance in the eyes of consumers and allow today's technology start-ups to compete with their European and US rivals."

The letter ends by asking for amendments to the current legislation - otherwise the future of Britain's copyright laws may end up severely compromised.

"We are poised for a period of huge innovation, with the much-needed benefits this will bring for our country's prosperity. But the Government must act now to implement Professor Hargreaves' recommendations if we are to compete on the global stage, free from the unnecessary obstacles of an outdated copyright system."

Source: TechRadar