Google Weighs In On MPAA vs Hotfile Dispute

Google has lent a hand to Hotfile in its current dispute with the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), stating that since the file sharing site complies with the law, what else is there to discuss?

The MPAA is currently trying to get Hotfile shut down, stating that since it doesn't remove every piece of copyright infringing content from the site then it is liable. Google however has disagreed, citing the Digital Millenium Copyright Act (DMCA). It says that it is the responsibility of the copyright holder to inform sites like Hotfile whether there is copywritten content being shared - in which case it then becomes the responsibility of the site to remove it.

Since Hotfile already complies with this, Google argues that the MPAA has no case. No matter what way it tries to spin it, current legislature places the burden of responsibility for routing out content that infringes copyright on the owner of it. It makes sense too. How is Hotfile to know what is infringing and what's not? It should also - as a business that is fair to its customers - not assume culpability of its users.

Google's actions in this instance aren't selfless however. There is a growing worry that YouTube could be targeted should bills like ACTA be passed throughout the world, though Google does already go above and beyond the law by removing certain copyright infringing content as it is posted on the streaming video site.

As Tech Crunch points out, Google Drive is just around the corner as well. Setting a precedent before it too is targeted is likely to be the main 'drive' for the search giant. Legislation from behind the bench gives companies like Google a great citation if a case like this was ever brought against it.