AM News: SSD Prices Set to Fall, Samsung Galaxy S3 Specs Revealed, Chinese Officials: Proview Rightfully Owns iPad Trademark

It looks like a number of smaller SSD manufacturers will exit the market as big SSD companies have started to cut down on price thanks to a significant reduction in the price of NAND flash. Josephine Lien and Jessie Shen from Digitimes quote sources in Taiwan and say that a number of channel retailers which usually sell memory products like memory cards and (USB) flash drives have started to offer SSDs.

The Samsung Galaxy S3 may find its place as this year's most advanced phone, as a benchmarking program has leaked its technical specifications. Although counted as rumour at the moment, one detail has already been confirmed by officials. AnTuTu, a benchmarking application that can be found on Google Play, reports that the future Galaxy S smartphone will outclass most existing devices, like the giant Galaxy Note, the recently released Galaxy Nexus and even the Asus Transformer Prime tablet.

It's being reported that Apple has almost no chance to win in its settlement meetings with Proview. The Chinese government regards Proview as the true owner of the iPad name, which makes the negotiations even trickier. The Chinese authorities have stated on many occasions their determination to protect the trademarks and intellectual property.

According to its recent conference call, Apple has earned $39.19 billion (24.27 billion GBP), in the second fiscal quarter of this year, by selling 35.1 million iPhones, 11.8 million iPads and 4 million Macs. The company has announced a 94 per cent year-over-year increase of net profit, meaning that now the quarterly net profit is $11.6 billion (7.18 billion GBP).

The "DNS Changer" malware, one of the most widespread viruses at the moment, could attack more than 350,000 computers worldwide on 9th July, with a big portion of the infected being from the UK. The FBI has stated that on the fated day, approximately a half of million devices could lose internet access, leaving them unprotected against DNS Changer, a virus developed by an Estonian organisation and which was discovered back in November last year.