EA’s EULA Covers All Bases

EA’s EULA Covers All Bases

EA Game’s End User License Agreement is a complete catchall protecting the firm from any legal wrongdoing, but it’s only accessible to users after they’ve purchased the game. If you don’t agree with it, EA advises you don’t play the game you just paid for.

Electronic Arts’ ability to pull a switch on gamers came to light a couple days ago when the publishing giant announced it would be halting support for the iOS Rock Band game, making it unplayable after 31st May for those that purchased it. This obviously angered gamers, some of whom had only recently paid for the game.

Despite the fact that EA has now retracted that decision, stating that the game will be playable for a while longer at least, Eurogamer did some digging into the company’s EULA. Ultimately it  protects EA regardless of what the company does. It’s only readable after you’ve purchased a game, even though it says: “By purchasing and/or using this application, you agree to the terms of the End User License Agreement.” So by buying an EA mobile game, you already agree to the document that you can only read after paying.

The fact it can be changed without notice too, means that you’ll need to re-read the 6,000+ word agreement regularly in case they slip something in. Most likely though, almost every user won’t even give it a glance. And why would you? You want to play a game, not read a legal document.

On top of all this, even if you’re mad at EA and want to do something about it, you’ll find it very difficult. Simply by buying the game – and therefore agreeing to the EULA – you “waive the right to a trial by jury or participate in a class action”.

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