Copyright Lobbyists Don't Necessarily Represent Bands

Despite copyright lobbyists, groups like the British Phonographic Industry (BPI) in the UK, RIAA in America and others around the world, continually claiming to be fighting for the interests of the artists they represent, that isn't always the case.

All Shall Perish, a deathcore band from Oakland, California, has found itself unable to protect its fans from legal action, all because of copyright. Despite having created an impressive library of tracks throughout its tenure, the band no longer owns the copyright on them. Its label, Nuclear Blast, sold the rights to a firm called World Digital Rights (WDR), based out of Panama. That company is now using it to attempt to sue 80 people it claims illegally downloaded the band's material.

Speaking with TorrentFreak, the band's manager Ryan Downey said that he was shocked at both the actions of the label and that of WDR. "The band, their attorney and myself have and will continue to take any steps to protect fans, yes, even those who file trade," he said.

He summed up what a lot of bands and music fans feel: "whatever the solution [to piracy] will be - streaming, subscription, Kickstarter, new ways of looking at it entirely, whatever comes about - the band and I are in agreement (as is their lawyer) that SUING MUSIC FANS SURE ISN'T IT."

For now there is some legal rangling going on between the label and WDR, as Nuclear Blast attempts to save some face and appease its understandably angry artists. It's all being done behind closed doors however, so until a decision is made we'll just have to wait and see.

This case is a clear example that whether copyright is infringed or not, not every artist believes suing their fans is the way forward.