Today's Tech: Black Galaxy S3 available to pre-order, Judge bars Samsung designer testimony, Microsoft renames Metro UI

Judge Lucy Koh, who appears poised to become a household name as the presiding judge in the Apple versus Samsung patent trial, has barred one of the South Korean company’s key designers from testifying in the case. Judge Koh agreed with Apple’s argument that Hyong Shin Park’s testimony would be irrelevant to the trial because she designed Samsung’s F700 handset, which is not one of the devices accused of infringing on the iPhone’s design patents.

In slightly less discouraging Samsung news, a black version of its flagship Galaxy S3 handset is now available to pre-order from Mobile Fun. It will run you a cool £499.95 SIM-free, and is expected be in stock in four to six weeks. The new colour palette, which joins the existing white and pebble blue, is expected to be on show at the IFA conference later this month.

Microsoft has apparently chosen to name its new user interface ‘Modern UI’ after dropping the ‘Metro’ moniker last week. The title change comes after reports that a German company, Metro AG, was claiming ownership over the ‘Metro’ trademark. The tech giant has since insisted that ‘Metro’ had merely been a working title and the new ‘Modern’ trademark was a part of the plan all along.

Many users are sceptical about Facebook's concern for our privacy and what they get up to with all our data. And it seems they have every right to be, after the social network was charged by the US Federal Trade Commission with failing to keep user information private, despite claiming they would. The settlement was agreed last year but has only now been approved. Have Zuckerberg and co. been lucky to get away without a fine?

Google has also been criticised for under-hand dealings, as its executives have been asked by MPs to justify its cheeky tax-dodging ploy in the UK. Despite amassing a turnover of £395 million on our shores last year, only £6 million of that was paid in tax. Labour MP John Mann is furious and wants the complex scheme stamped out. Follow the link to see exactly how Google manages to keep so much of its cash away from our clutches.