Today's Tech: BlackBerry 10 Laguna phone leaked, Apple backtracks on Maps boast, we investigate crowdfunding

We’ve been building up to RIM’s impending BlackBerry 10 launch for some time now, with many billing the platform’s release as the pivotal moment that will make or break the future of the financially-stricken firm. Much has been written and speculated about the software, but less attention has been paid to the hardware that will be running it - an equally crucial element of RIM’s attempt at a revival. We may hear more about potential BB10 devices now however, as one of the first major leaks detailing a phone has emerged. The device in question is being dubbed the Laguna and we have the full (alleged) specifications revealed for your reading pleasure.

More and more tech innovation and new products are brought to our attention via crowdfunding sites these days, putting the very concept of such platforms under the spotlight. Sites including Kickstarter and Indiegogo have become most prominent – the former helping to create great buzz around products like the Ouya game console and Pebble ‘Smartwatch’ – but do their systems lead to sustainable success for the ideas put forward? And what do contributors gain from their investments? Tackling these questions and much more is Joe Martin, in his excellent analysis of crowdfunding, so follow the link.

You're not getting tired of all the slightly asinine grumbling about iPhone 5, are you? Good, because some quarters of the technology world just can't get enough of Apple's latest handset and, more specifically, the various controversies that continue to surround it. Today, we got wind that - following Tim Cook's grovelling iOS 6 Maps apology last week - the Cupertino-based tech titan has removed the more extravagant boasts about its new cartography app. Having achieved considerable infamy by, among other things, deciding that Berlin is a mini-cab firm based in Antarctica, Apple has perhaps prudently altered claims that its Maps amounts to "the most powerful mapping service ever," instead refocusing its bragging on the app's "beautiful vector-based interface." Fair enough, I suppose, but what if iOS 6 Maps really could get you a lift after a heavy night out in the South Pole?

On a more serious note, we'd like to highlight a joint initiative by Missing Children Europe and Child Focus, dubbed the NotFound project. The Brussels-based campaign is asking that website owners display images of missing children on their 404 errors pages, with any domain that wants to participate needing only to download a file via notfound.org and integrate it into their site's code. The world sure has evolved from milk cartons and telephone hotlines, it seems, and we think this is an idea that deserves to gain considerable traction. Check out our write up, but more importantly, go to notfound.org's homepage to find out how you can participate.