Skobbler updates GPS Navigation 2 app for iOS 6, iPhone 5

German location technology specialist Skobbler has launched a new version of its popular iPhone sat-nav app, GPS Navigation 2.

Version 4.3 of the programme is optimised to support the latest mobile software and hardware, namely iOS 6 and the iPhone 5. In addition, the app's OpenStreetMap data has been updated to allow both online and offline use, while audio output can now be delivered wirelessly via Bluetooth.

"We're extremely proud of the success that GPS Navigation 2 has experienced, and feel it's a fair reward for our continued efforts to regularly improve our software and tailor it to meet the demands and feedback of our growing consumer base," said Marcus Thielking, co-founder of Skobbler.

"We're even more confident that we can continue to be the number one navigation solution for Apple users across Europe," he added.

To celebrate the release of its refreshed software, Skobbler is currently running a number of promotional offers for GPS Navigation 2 in-app purchases. Map packages are now available at significantly discounted prices, with a UK and Ireland bundle costing just 69p, down from a regular price of £2.49. A digital set of all European and North American country maps is also available at bin end prices, setting buyers back just £1.99, compared to a regular price of £4.99.

The latest iteration of GPS Navigation 2 is now available to download via Apple's App Store and costs £1.49.

"Our promotion enables users to install the UK and Ireland maps for only 69p respectively, or get unlimited offline access to the entire European or North American map portfolio for a mere £1.99 each, allowing them to 'conquer the continents' without ever having to worry about horrendous high roaming charges. Such value-for-money simply cannot be found anywhere else in the market," Thielking ventured.

Berlin-based Skobbler boasts more than 3 million iOS download and is currently the number one paid iOS navigation app in the UK.

Apple's native iOS 6 mapping software - the Cupertino-based tech titan's first without Google - has been widely condemned since its release back in September. Mysteriously re-located buildings, cities in the sea, and outdated points-of-interest have been some of Joe iPhone's main bones of contention, with the public outcry prompting Apple to issue a rare apology for its ill-prepared Maps software.

Google is currently rumoured to be prepping its first iOS Maps app as a third-party.