Hands on: Lenovo IdeaPad Lynx K3011 Windows 8 hybrid laptop

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The Lenovo Lynx, otherwise known as the IdeaPad K3011, represents the Chinese company’s latest offering for those looking for a hybrid device where the tablet and the keyboard are both separate.

The Lynx is essentially Lenovo’s take on the Asus Eee Pad Transformer, which is a tablet that plugs into a keyboard docking station, thereby transforming into an ultra-portable laptop. Like Asus’ device, the Lenovo Lynx boosts some spectacular battery life (up to 16 hours) in laptop mode, as the keyboard integrates a secondary battery as well.

We’d probably prefer a less visible housing for the tablet. And the docking station itself has its own quirks: you cannot tilt the docking mechanism (see photos, below) without the tablet and you can only take out the tablet when is perfectly vertical, though some of these issues might have been ironed out since we were presented with pre-production samples.

The tablet is powered by Windows 8 and connectivity and storage-wise has a microSD card slot, a micro HDMI port, an audio out port. amd a webcam on the main unit, while the dock houses two USB ports and another HDMI port (which supersedes and disables the one on the tablet when docked). The keyboard and the TouchPad both bear the hallmarks of Lenovo’s design - slightly curvy island-style keys and a bigger-than-average touch pad.

In the engine room, Lenovo opted for an Intel Atom “Clovertrail” processor to power the tablet and we were surprised at how nippy it was.

That said, the clip-and-secure design is not our cup of tea - it is a decent attempt which is likely to fill a niche, but we found it to be slightly cumbersome to the Lynx's otherwise appealingly minimalist look and feel - an eyesore, in layman's terms. The Lynx will be available in the UK in December with pricing expected to be announced shortly.