Samsung Galaxy Note 4 design, specs and launch rumours: LIVE

Feedback

Today's Tech: Surface Pro pricing and disappointing battery life revealed, Intel touts anti-theft security feature

TabletsNews
by Rawiya Kameir
, 30 Nov 2012News
Today's Tech: Surface Pro pricing and disappointing battery life revealed, Intel touts anti-theft security feature

As mobile computing continues to grow, it's likely that we will see as much competition between microprocessor manufacturers as between big-name tech firms like Apple and Samsung. Accordingly, Joel Hruska explores ARM's Cortex-A15 chip, contextualizing its relatively low performance when measured against offerings from Intel and AMD. While ARM's chip is nowhere near as powerful as Intel's Core i3-330M, the company certainly has the potential to shake up the processor market. Read on to find out just why that is.

Following Microsoft's release of the US pricing for the its eagerly awaited Surface tablet with Windows Pro, it has also come to light that the device will have half the battery life of the current Surface RT model. The Surface Pro, set to be released in January, will come in two options: 64GB for $899 (£560) or 128GB for $999 (£623). A tweet posted by the Surface team at Microsoft confirmed also noted that the new version will have four to five hours of battery life - half that of the Surface RT, which currently gets between eight to ten hours.

Samsung has decided to tackle its recent labour controversy head-on by openly discussing the problems its suppliers in China face in upholding work environment standards. The South Korean company blamed local regulations that encourage the practice of instituting fines for "faulty production" and late attendance. Samsung also explained the rationale behind its policy of in-house manufacture, which enables it to adapt to an ever-changing market. Follow the link for more details on the firm's pledge to improve suppliers' factory working conditions.

While most laptop owners recognise the threats that exist online and have the necessary software installed to safeguard the machine, we don't always have measures in place to deal with the consequences of the actual device being stolen. So it's just as well Intel is continuing to advance its anti-theft technology within the hardware itself - protecting our sensitive data if it ends up in the wrong hands. ITProPortal spoke to the company and got the low-down on the latest encryption solutions as well as the fabled 'poison pill'...so read on for the full feature.

Topics
blog comments powered by Disqus