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Samsung Galaxy S3 demand "red hot" as Apple iPhone slips

BusinessNews
by Angela Moscaritolo, 16 Jan 2013News
Samsung Galaxy S3 demand "red hot" as Apple iPhone slips

Apple's iPhone remains the most coveted smartphone among prospective buyers, though rival Samsung is riding an "explosive wave of momentum," according to a new survey from 451 Research's ChangeWave service.

The December 2012 survey of more than 4,000 consumers in North America looking to buy a smartphone in the next 90 days found that half planned to purchase an iPhone. That's down from 71 per cent during the previous quarter's survey, which was conducted as the iPhone 5 made its debut, but still represents a "solid showing" for Apple, ChangeWave said - despite recent reports indicating Apple slimmed down its iPhone component orders amidst sluggish demand.

Meanwhile, 21 per cent of potential smartphone buyers are planning to get a Samsung device, up from 13 per cent in September. Of those planning to buy a Samsung phone in the next 90 days, 69 per cent are interested in the Galaxy S3, while 23 per cent prefer the Galaxy Note 2.

"Consumer buying intent for Samsung smartphones has been extraordinary to start the year," Paul Carton, vice president of research for ChangeWave, said in a statement. "Considering the Galaxy S3 has been out for several months we'd normally expect a slowdown by now — but it's still red hot. We're also seeing strong interest in Samsung's large-screen phone — the Galaxy Note 2. Supersize smart phones are taking the industry by storm in 2013."

ChangeWave also queried current smartphone owners to find out how satisfied they are with their device. Broken down by mobile operating systems, Apple's iOS came out on top with 71 per cent of users saying they are very satisfied with their iPhone's platform. Interestingly, Windows Phone took the second spot, garnering high satisfaction ratings from 53 per cent of users. Google's Android came in third with 48 per cent of users, followed by fourth-place RIM, which earned high marks from just 26 per cent of those surveyed.

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