TechCrunch Disrupt Europe 2014: News, photos and the Startup Battlefield live from London

Feedback

Mega bugs prompt apology from Kim Dotcom

WebNews
, 22 Jan 2013News
Mega bugs prompt apology from Kim Dotcom

Kim Dotcom has apologised for his new site Mega’s current “poor service quality”. The Megaupload founder pointed to “massive global” demand for the current slow speeds experienced at mega.co.nz.

According to Dotcom his new file-sharing service recorded one million unique visitors within the first 14 hours of going live, half of which became registered members giving them access to 50GB of free storage.

"If I would tell you how many signups we had since the launch you wouldn't believe it. I can't believe it. So, I won't tell you," Kim tweeted.

However, he also admitted to not conducting any system checks in preparation for anticipated demand.

"We launched Mega without traffic tests. That's like building a sports car from scratch and taking it straight to the Gumball," he said.

Dotcom went on to declare that his team is hard at work on providing a solution to the sites teething problems which he is confident will be resolved soon.

“We are making good progress. Adding servers and fixing bugs. It should not be long until you can enjoy Mega without hiccups,” he explained.

Dotcom will hopefully learn from the mistakes of this launch as Mega represents the first step in a larger release strategy - he plans to launch additional affiliated services over the next six months.

Kim has already discussed plans to launch new music service Megabox in due time, however, it will not be accompanied by “a fancy launch event.”

Moreover, he's since begun to talk-up a prospective streaming service, Megamovie, which is likely a replacement for his preceding site Megavideo. This will purportedly share a similar fiscal model to that of the network’s aforementioned music service – giving the content producer a cut of the proceeds.

A catch-all membership to the Mega network’s services can be attained via signing up for the forthcoming initiative, Megakey. This will give the network’s users free credits to access content, as Megakey utilises an ad-serving browser plugin to generate revenue. For those of you who are ad-averse, an alternative is also available.

“You can choose to just straight-out buy the music that is on the [Megabox] site, just like you would on iTunes,” Kim told arstechnica.

Topics
blog comments powered by Disqus