Today's Tech: Microsoft Surface Pro release date set, EE reveals new 4G tariffs, question marks raised over Twitter security

Microsoft teased plans to release a Windows 8 Pro-based version of its Surface hybrid tablet last year, but the company has finally gotten around to revealing more details about the device. We now know that the Surface Pro will launch on 9 February in the US and Canada, with a 64GB model due to retail for $899 (£570) and a 128GB version selling for $999 (£630). Unlike the Surface RT, Microsoft's ARM-powered tablet, the Pro will be compatible with corporate infrastructure, as well as existing apps running on Windows XP and higher, including browsers other than Internet Explorer. Read on for more details about the Surface Pro's tech specs and availability.

The safety of signing into third-party applications using Twitter credentials has been called into question today, after a researcher discovered that an application bypassed the social network’s security to access restricted information from his account. Cesar Cerrudo's private direct messages on Twitter suddenly became not so private while he experimented with another app, throwing doubt over the network’s ability to keep our data as safe as it claims. Follow the link to see how the breach took place and what it means for you and your privacy.

With the impending increase of competition in the high-speed mobile broadband market no doubt in mind, EE has moved to address complaints that its 4G network offers too little punch for your pound. The UK's only current LTE provider has announced a range of new tariffs, dropping its entry-level £36 a month deal to £31, as well as introducing a 20GB data plan for "super-users." A range of attractive handsets are available with the refreshed packages, which represent a potentially shrewd move on the network's part as it looks to snare as many customers as possible in the dying days of its exclusive access to the UK's LTE spectrum. Speaking of which, Ofcom officially commenced its 4G auction this week, so follow the link for more on that story as well.

Google enjoyed a strong performance in the final fiscal quarter of 2012, reporting a revenue growth of 36 per cent from the corresponding period in 2011. Advertising maintained its position as the search firm’s primary revenue stream, generating 89 per cent of its quarterly haul. However, Motorola Mobility provided another sour note to Google’s report, recording a revenue loss of 23 per cent as operating costs proved too severe for profit gains to be feasible.